Termcard

All Oxford University Scientific Society events are open to the general public. All talks begin at 18:30.

Free entry for students at St Anne’s College for talks held at St Anne’s College.

Hilary Term 2018:

Week 1 Wed 16/01

NOTE: Starts at 18:00

Prof. Adrian Hill, Director, The Jenner InstituteUniversity of Oxford

Malaria Vaccines – an Oxford First

Week 2 Wed 23/01 Dr. Tom Crawford, Mathematical Institute

Navier-Stokes Stripped

Week 3 Wed 30/01 Dr Katherine Wheelhouse, GSK

“Don’t Process Chemists Just Make Things Bigger?”

Week 4 Wed 06/02 Dr Suzie Sheehy, University of Oxford

“Particle Accelerators: From Curiosity Driven
Research To Life-Changing Technology”

Week 5 Wed 13/02 Prof Elspeth Garman, University of Oxford

“106 years of Crystallography: what has it taught us and where will it lead us?”

Week 6 Wed 20/02

NOTE: Starts at 18:00

 Bhavin Turakhia

“Building a billion dollar tech business with zero funding – My story and lessons”

Week 7 Wed 27/02

NOTE: Starts at 18:00

Week 8 Wed 06/03

Week 9           Wed 13/03

                         NOTE: Starts at 18:00


NOTE: Events are £2 for non-members of OUSS, and free for members. Membership can be bought on the door (£10 for one year or £20 for life).

Events:
Week 1: Prof. Adrian Hill, Director, The Jenner Institute

Malaria Vaccines – an Oxford First

NOTE: Starts at 18:00
Venue:
St Anne’s College

Malaria is the most devastating parasitic disease of humans and a major cause of
childhood mortality in developing countries. Malaria causes hundreds of millions of
disease episodes and half a million deaths each year, and progress in reducing
morality has stalled. Efforts to make a malaria vaccine stretch back many decades
but new data indicate that a highly effective malaria vaccine should be deployable in
the mid-2020s. A multi-stage vaccine from Oxford has arguably the best chance of
filling that role and recent progress in developing such a vaccine at Oxford and at
field sites in malaria-endemic countries will be summarised.


Week 2: Dr. Tom Crawford, Mathematical Institute

Navier-Stokes Stripped

Venue: Maplethorpe Hall, St Hugh’s College St Margaret’s Road�Oxford, OX2 6LE

The Navier-Stokes equations model the flow of every fluid on Earth, but yet we know very little about them. So little in fact, there is currently a $1 million prize for anyone that can help to improve our understanding of how these fascinating equations work. In this talk, Dr Tom Crawford will strip back the Navier-Stokes equations layer-by-layer as he explains them in a way that everyone can understand… Based on Tom’s hit YouTube series ‘Equations Stripped’.

Dr Tom Crawford is a maths tutor at the University of Oxford with a mission to share his love of maths with the world. His award-winning website tomrocksmaths.com features videos, podcasts, articles and puzzles designed to make maths more entertaining, exciting and enthralling for all. Whether he’s performing live as the Naked Mathematician with Equations Stripped, telling you the fun facts about numbers that you didn’t realise you’ve secretly always wanted to know with his Funbers series on the BBC, or getting another maths tattoo (6 and counting), it’s safe to say Tom is always finding new ways to misbehave with numbers!


Week 3: Katherine Wheelhouse
“Don’t Process Chemists Just Make Things Bigger?”
Venue: 
Danson Room, Trinity College

Dr Katherine Wheelhouse did her MChem at Jesus College, Oxford, matriculating in 2000; her MChem project was carried out under the supervision of Professor Tim Donohoe in the area of ring-closing metathesis for heterocycle synthesis. She stayed in the Donohoe group for a DPhil, working on osmium- mediated oxidative cyclisation reactions before joining GSK as a process chemist in 2008. Since 2011 Katherine has specialised in application of chemical cataysis to pharmaceutical manufacture. She is a GSK scientific fellow, a member of the RSC Applied Catalysis Committee and also of the editorial advisory board of the journal Organic Process Research and Development..

Katherine is going to talk about what it is that process chemists do (to enable doing things bigger) and how this fits into the development of medicines, illustrating with some examples from recent projects.


Week 4: Dr Suzie Sheehy, University of Oxford

“Particle Accelerators: From Curiosity Driven Research To Life-Changing Technology”

Venue: Danson Room, Trinity College

Dr. Suzie Sheehy designs particle accelerators. She’s fascinated by
using accelerator physics to help us re-invent technology for
applications in areas such as medicine and energy. Her research
projects have ranged from the design of new cancer treatment
accelerators to building a scaled-down experiment that
models particle beams, answering fundamental questions about
the physics of beams that are beyond reach of computer
simulations.
Dr. Sheehy is currently a Royal Society University Research Fellow
at the University of Oxford, where she also teaches graduate-level
accelerator physics. Alongside her research, Suzie is a prolific public
speaker, presenter and science communicator. She is an expert TV
presenter for Impossible Engineering on Discovery Channel and
has co-written and delivered live high-octane headline shows for
tens of thousands of students at the Big Bang Fair and
elsewhere. Her recent TEDx talk was viewed by over half a million
people in its first few days online, and she regularly presents public
and schools lectures around the UK and further afield at major
science festivals and venues like the Royal Institution


Week 5: Prof Elspeth Garman, University of Oxford

“106 years of Crystallography: what has it taught us and where will it lead us?”

Venue: Danson Room, Trinity College

What has the art of the chocolatier got to do with drug discovery, proteins and DNA? The linking theme is crystals, which allow us to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all sizes of molecules, ranging from the tiny chocolate moiety to the much larger proteins that allow our bodies to function through to the DNA that carries our genetic information. Crystallography was born in 1913 with the determination of the 3-D structure of sodium chloride (salt) by the Bragg father and son team. It has flowered to elucidate many disciplines since then, with applications in engineering, physics, chemistry, earth sciences and biology. Using crystallography, we can unravel the shapes of biomolecules in our bodies that are targets for drugs against disease, and thus identify new treatments. I will focus on this last field, and give an overview of what is currently achievable and what may be possible in the future (my crystal ball permitting!).


Week 6:  Bhavin Turakhia

“Building a billion dollar tech business with zero funding – My story and lessons”

Venue: Mary Ogylvie Lecture Theatre, St Anne’s College

56 Woodstock Rd, Oxford OX2 6HS

NOTE: Starts at 18:00

Bhavin is a serial tech entrepreneur. He is a founder / co-founder of 5 tech
businesses, 2 of which he exited for $1.2 billion. Bhavin will be sharing his journey and the lessons he has learned along the way.

Speaker Profile: Serial entrepreneur and billionaire, Bhavin Turakhia is driven by a passion for problem-solving and maximizing efficiency through technology driven innovations. In the last 22 years, he has built 5 successful businesses, all driven by his belief that “it is our moral obligation to make an impact that is proportionate to our potential”. At 17, he co-founded Resellerclub, Logicboxes and BigRock, which he exited in a $160mn transaction in 2014. He is presently heading Flock – a suite of productivity apps, Radix – a leading registry for top-level extensions, and Zeta – a digital payments platform.


Week 7:
NOTE: Starts at 18:00
Venue:
St Anne’s College

 


Week 8:

Venue: 


Week 9: 

NOTE: Starts at 18:00
Venue:
St Anne’s College


NOTE: Events are £2 for non-members of OUSS, and free for members. Membership can be bought on the door (£10 for one year or £20 for life).